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Dealing with Bathsheba

 


 


Dealing with Bathsheba-
By Ray Comfort


 

King David should have been busy in battle, but he was instead idly gazing at where he shouldn't have been looking.  The devil has a use for idle eyes, and it wasn't long before David was eyeing his neighbor's wife.  The Scriptures tell us that lust brings forth sin, and it certainly did with David.  His neighborly coveting lead to adultery, murder, theft and hypocrisy, and it all had its roots in the subtle sin of "idolatry."  In order to accommodate our sins idolatry convinces us that God is either blind, sinful, or that He doesn't exist.


 


Whenever a professing Christian tells me that he has a problem with pornography, I immediately think of idolatry. His image of what God is like is erroneous. What does he think God is doing while he is looking at pornography? If asked if he would ever look at porn in a worship service, he would probably say that he wouldn't. He thinks that the Almighty--the ever-present and all-seeing God is confined to a building we wrongly call a "church."  This error is often perpetuated by worship leaders who talk about "entering" the presence of God for worship, when we are always in His presence. He's there in the bedroom as lust-filled eyes feed upon porn. He's there in the corridors of the human mind, as unclean images are displayed on the screen of the imagination.


 


These are days in which it is common for men to have "accountability partners" when it comes to the issue of lust.  It means that we confide in a Christian brother and let him know how we are doing in our moral battles.   We become accountable to him. The problem with that is that if I am going to secretly commit adultery in my heart through lust, I'm not going to have a problem when it comes to lying to someone about my moral state.  It is far more sensible to make God our accountability partner. He's the One we should be accountable to now, because He's the One we will be accountable to on Judgment Day.  The Scriptures tell us "Surely his salvation is near them that fear him…" (Psalm 85:9). It's the fear of God that is missing when we feel at liberty to gaze at Bathsheba.


Bathsheba on Billboards



As someone who desires to reach the lost, you have enlisted as a good soldier of Jesus Christ. You have been recruited for warfare, not to idly eye this sinful world. If you have any inkling to, you can be sure the enemy will have a Bathsheba in your sights.  You will see her on billboards, in movies, magazine covers, and television advertisements.  She wants to find her way into your thoughts and into your dreams.  If you are bored, depressed, or plagued with lustful thoughts, then make sure you get rid of every avenue to her door, because with a click of your mouse you can commit adultery in your heart (see Matthew 5:27-28).  


 


Jesus said that if your hand causes you to sin, cut it off, and then cast it from you; that's how terribly serious sin is. Hands are pretty handy, so it would be better and easier to get rid of the mouse and cut off Internet access.  If you don't make a move in that direction, you are a standing target for the enemy. So go onto the streets (the highways and byways) and share the gospel with someone who is on their way to Hell, and doesn't know it.  Compel them to come into the kingdom of God. 


 


There's no room for idle thoughts if you are keeping your mind in the battle for the lost.  I want to eat more if I'm doing nothing. If I find myself idle, I find myself standing in front of an open refrigerator. But if I keep myself busy doing something, I hardly think about food.  If I pack my garden with healthy plants, there will be no room for weeds.  We must fill our minds with the Word of God, prayerfully cultivate a healthy fear of the Lord, and keep busy with a passion for the lost rather than for our neighbor's wife or daughter.