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NH: Muslims enraged by 9/11 first-responders badge in hotel lobby, are evicted, innkeeper charged with “hate crime”

“Protasowicki said Tuesday the couple identified as Mohamed Ghallami and Chahrazade Mounaji arrived and got upset when they saw a 911 first-responders badge in the lobby. They demanded a refund. But under the inn’s policy, refunds weren’t possible.”

An altercation ensued, after which, Protasowicki says, Ghallami and Mounaji “pulled the race card.” That is an entirely believable charge, especially given the fact that fake anti-Muslim hate crimes, faked by Muslims themselves, are a big business. But are the police likely to take that fact into account? Almost certainly not. The police appear to have acted in this incident in Jackson, New Hampshire the way they acted in the UK when given reports of Muslim rape gang activity — by doing nothing to stop the Muslim perpetrators and blaming the victim. Are police in New Hampshire now Sharia-compliant? Why did they ignore Protasowicki’s claim that Mohamed Ghallami had assaulted her? Why did they arrest her only, thereby discounting her side of the story altogether?

Note also the comment from a representative of Hamas-linked CAIR. Hamas-linked CAIR, designated a terror organization by the United Arab Emirates, and other Muslims have on many occasions not hesitated to stoop even to fabricating “hate crimes,” including attacks on mosques. The larger strategy is to paint a picture of Muslims as being harassed and persecuted in the U.S., and deserving of law enforcement protection, not law enforcement scrutiny. If that strategy succeeds, the jihad will be able to advance unopposed and unimpeded, with no one daring to say a negative word about the poor victims. Until, that is, it is far, far too late.

“Jackson woman accused of hate crime,” by Daymond Steer, Conway Daily Sun, July 31, 2018 (thanks to Kafir):

OSSIPEE — A Carroll County Superior Court grand jury has indicted a Jackson woman on two counts of simple assault “subject to a hate crime enhancement,” according to a statement from the New Hampshire Attorney General and the Carroll County Attorney.

The woman, an innkeeper for her parents’ lodging establishment on Route 16 in Jackson, said the allegations are unfounded and that she was merely ejecting unruly guests who were harassing her.

The grand jury indicted Priscilla Protasowicki, 32, of Jackson on July 20 of allegedly assaulting two people.

Named as victims in the indictment are Mohamed Ghallami and Chahrazade Mounaji. According to media reports, they are from Massachusetts.

“These charges allege that Ms. Protasowicki, while working at the Covered Bridge Riverview Lodge in Jackson, assaulted two patrons in an effort to remove them from the establishment because of their religion and perceived national origin,” said the statement.

“The charge of simple assault subject to the hate-crime enhancement carries a possible maximum sentence of five years in the New Hampshire State Prison.”

The indictments say Protasowicki pushed the patrons with her hands and that “the defendant was substantially motivated to commit the crime because of hostility towards the victim’s religion, race, creed or national origin.”…

Protasowicki also is facing a New Hampshire Civil Rights Act action that was initiated by the Attorney General’s office. The maximum civil penalty for a violation of the act is a $5,000 fine. She may also be ordered to pay restitution….

Assistant Attorney General Elizabeth Lahey told the Sun that the alleged victims were a Muslim couple and their daughter.

She said Protasowicki “assumed that they are from the Middle East, and they are not,” said Lahey, who declined comment when asked what nationality the people were.

Reached by phone Tuesday, Protasowicki denied being racist or shoving anybody. She said an “Arabian” couple booked the room but on arrival became unhappy with the room and demanded a refund.

Protasowicki, whose parents, Halina and Alexander Protasowicki, own the lodge, said there are no refunds per company policy but that the family could reschedule any time within a year. The room rate was $80 per night.

“I treat everybody the same,” said Protasowicki. “If you didn’t like the place, you shouldn’t have booked it.”

Protasowicki said the couple “pulled the race card” on her, saying the man told the woman to get her phone out and start recording the dispute and that they would make a lot of money posting the video on YouTube.

“I never touched this woman, I never touched her phone — nothing,” said Protasowicki. “The man, on the other hand, refused to leave. I gently escorted him out. I hardly, barely even touched this guy.”

She said they refused to show her their IDs or the credit card they used to book the room. Thus, “they were trespassing,” said Protasowicki.

She said police ignored allegations she made against the couple, including that the man grabbed her shirt. She also said they ignored her brother’s police report and refused to take one from her mother, who is Polish and doesn’t write in English well.

She said the Jackson police dropped the assault charges for lack of a case….

“With Hate Crime Assault Case, AG’s New Civil Rights Unit Takes Center Stage,” by Todd Bookman, NHPR, August 2, 2018 (thanks to the Geller Report):

…Along with a dedicated staff within the Department of Justice to handle these complaints, the Civil Rights Unit also has a larger mission. It partners with local law enforcement on investigations, and leads educational trainings. Lahey says it’s also intent on sending a message about where the state stands on discrimination.

“We need to not only enforce the law but make sure that we are reaching out and supporting the communities that are affected by these types of acts or, also, perhaps especially vulnerable to hate crimes and hate conduct and hate incidents and hate speech.”

This week, Lahey and the Civil Rights Unit filed what she calls its first formal action. It’s bringing a hate crime case against a 32-year old hotel employee named Priscilla Protasowicki. Protasowicki and her family run the Covered Bridge Riverview Lodge, a small inn in the mountain town of Jackson with the motto: ‘Enter as Strangers, Leave as Friends.’

The state has released limited information about incident, but Protasowicki is eager to share her side of the story.

She says in April, a family called and asked for a room and wanted to check in early.

“So I clean the room, I got it all ready, I made it really extra nice for them. Sprayed it, made it smell good, clean it, scrub it, and I’m there at 10 o’clock ready for them to check in,” she says.

But when the family arrived, Protasowicki says they criticized the hotel’s cleanliness, and asked for a refund, something the hotel has a policy against.

“Doesn’t matter if you are black, white, Asian, Muslim,” says Protasowicki. “If somebody comes here and they say I want a refund, I have to give them the same policy as I tell everybody: no refund.”

What happened in the hotel lobby next is the focus of the state’s case. Prosecutors allege the confrontation escalated and the victims were shoved out of the door. They contend that during the dispute, Protasowicki made comments about the family’s Muslim religion, and that they weren’t welcome at the inn because of their faith. The wife was wearing a hijab, a traditional Muslim covering.

Protasowicki denies the allegations.

“This had nothing to do with race,” she says. “It’s the fact that they didn’t even want to stay here. I wanted them to stay here. I’ve had Muslims stay here for a week. They’re very nice people. They played with my kids. I invited them up to my private living quarters. But these people were just scum like you wouldn’t believe. These people in particular were like, I don’t know, radicalized or something.”

Protasowicki didn’t elaborate on these statements, or what she meant by “radicalized.” Prosecutors describe the couple as a family from Massachusetts on vacation in the White Mountains.

The incident ended with the local police arriving on scene. If convicted of the simple assault and enhanced hate crime charges, she faces up to five years in prison and fines….

“Manager of Jackson inn accused of shoving couple under hate crime law,” Associated Press, July 31, 2018 (thanks to the Geller Report):

…Protasowicki said Tuesday the couple identified as Mohamed Ghallami and Chahrazade Mounaji arrived and got upset when they saw a 911 first-responders badge in the lobby. They demanded a refund. But under the inn’s policy, refunds weren’t possible….

“Court documents shed light on alleged innkeeper hate crimes,” by Daymond Steer, Conway Daily Sun, August 1, 2018 (thanks to the Geller Report):

OSSIPEE — Documents filed in Carroll County Superior Court shed more light on the civil and criminal case against the Jackson innkeeper who is accused of assaulting two patrons over their Islamic faith and perceived nationality.

Meanwhile the innkeeper is threatening to sue the town to remove its police chief.

The woman, an innkeeper for her parents’ lodging establishment on Route 16 in Jackson, said the allegations are unfounded and that she was merely ejecting unruly guests who were harassing her.

The grand jury indicted Priscilla Protasowicki, 32, of Jackson on July 20 of allegedly assaulting two people. Named as victims in the indictment are Mohamed Ghallami and Chahrazade Mounaji who are from Massachusetts and were with their 8-year-old daughter.

The indictments say Protasowicki pushed the patrons with her hands and that “the defendant was substantially motivated to commit the crime because of hostility towards the victim’s religion, race, creed or national origin.”

The alleged crimes happened on April 20.

Protasowicki also is facing a New Hampshire Civil Rights Act action that was initiated by the Attorney General’s office. The maximum civil penalty for a violation of the act is a $5,000 fine. She may also be ordered to pay restitution.

The Sun received a press release from the New Hampshire Attorney General and the Carroll County Attorney’s Office on Tuesday, shortly before deadline, along with the criminal indictments. On Wednesday, the Sun went to the Carroll County Superior Court to review the civil and criminal case files.

Much more detail was found in the civil case.

“Here, the defendant violated the Act when she pushed and shoved Mounjai and Ghallami in and effort to remove them from the Covered Bridge Lodge because — in her own words ‘You’re a Muslim. You are not supposed to be here,” wrote Assistant Attorney General Elizabeth Lahey.”In response to this the State asks this Court to impose civil penalties against the defendant as well as to enjoin her from further violating the civil rights of the State’s residents and guests.”

The couple had planned to stay at the lodge for a fourth night of a vacation. The previous three nights were spent at a hotel in Conway.

“They quickly noticed that the property did not resemble the property displayed online,” said Lahey. “The couple’s daughter also did not like that the property was a motel rather than a hotel, and did not want to stay there.”

The family also reported that the lobby “smelled and was very dusty.”

They asked for a refund but were offered a voucher rather than a refund.

“The defendant then looked at Mounaji and commented on her hijab, and said ‘You’re a Muslim. You are not supposed to be here.'”

Ghallami objected to the way his family was being treated.

“The defendant then jumped out from behind the desk, grabbed Ghallami by the forearm, and pushed him toward the exit,” Lahey. “Ghallami kept his hands straight up in the air, so it was clear he was not pushing the defendant back. Mounaji started to record the incident on her phone.”

The civil complaint says Protasowicki also pushed and shoved Mounaji all the while telling them they shouldn’t be here.”

The couple called police and Protasowicki was arrested. She allegedly asked officers if the couple was here legally. She also complained to the New Hampshire Attorney General’s Office about Jackson Police.

“Recently, he had me arrested again for simple assault, after I legally defended myself against a couple of Arabian terrorists who came onto my property causing chaos,” Protasowicki’s complaint read in part.

Protasowicki told the Sun that she was merely defending her family’s property from trespassers who were harassing her.

Ghallami, in an affidavit, said he has been in the United States for 25 years and this is the first time anyone made him feel unwelcome. He said that she accused them of killing children because she thought they were Middle Eastern.

Mounaji said their daughter has had nightmares because of the incident.

Mounaji said Protasowicki’s brother, Derek Protasowicki, was “nice” to them.

On Wednesday, Priscilla Protasowicki sent the Sun a letter that she had sent to an investigator with the Attorney General’s Office. At the beginning of the letter she said she would file a civil suit against Jackson selectmen because of the treatment she received from Police Chief Chris Perley.

“Last year, I was brutally assaulted by a guest, and Mr. Perley called it ‘mutual combat’ even though Officer Ryan McDonald (c)alled me, ‘the Victim.’ I never fought back and caught it all on camera,” said Protasowicki. “Mr. Chief Perley continues to be a major problem and threat to our community, due to his unprofessionalism.”

“This last month, a couple of Arabs came to our inn and began terrorizing me. Many Arabs have stayed at our inn with no problem, but these people came here with a problem. They had to be escorted out of the hotel lobby, but instead of the Jackson Police charging them accordingly, they had me arrested for simple assault.”

The Council on American Islamic Relations, on Wednesday, issued a statement saying they “welcome” the Attorney General’s decision to pursue actions under the Civil Rights Act.

“These types of alleged hate crimes are part of a disturbing trend nationwide and are violations of civil rights that must be afforded to all Americans, regardless of faith or background,” CAIR National Communications Manager Naaz Modan….

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